Tag Archives: rustic

12-12-15

It is our big day! Yeah!

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And the day that we have waited, finally arrived. The intense feeling of varied emotions was there and it’s overwhelming. Thirty minutes before 10:00 AM I could still see busy folks: OTD coordinators preparing the aisle, photographers eyeing for a perfect spot, florist arranging the flowers and the event organizer finalizing the order of the entourage. There was a delight on my face seeing how meticulous and critical they are on their individual task.

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At exactly 10:00, the ceremony started, but I don’t see my soon to be wife just yet. I was a little early in the church as per tradition and I was there very much prepared to take my walk to the altar. When the music started, the processional march also went next. Before I took several steps onward, I glimpsed at the back searching for the bride and yet there’s no trace of her as the church’s main door was close.I knew there’s a drama behind the idea of close doors. This might give my wife a grand entrance and on my part, a thrilling and exciting experience while waiting.Yes, it did. Standing on the groom spot, anticipating for the bride is one of the most exhilarating feelings any man can have. It feels like a mix of different emotions is fighting inside you. Surreal and simply unexplainable, I think that’s the word. When the door finally opened that’s the moment my wife came in, walking to the tune of Sara Bareilles “I choose you” which my cousin had wonderfully sang.

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My wife and the wedding singer (Jan Irene Valenzuela)

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My wife and our event Manager ( Mely Olleres)

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My middle school best buddies together with Jomer Concepcion(the guy in red), our host.

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The reception…

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The foods…

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native crabs from Catanduanes

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and shrimps too…

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The personalized photo-booth

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ai and john

Beautiful and Magical! That’s all I can say and that justify all the hard work we’ve done all throughout the event process. But I knew that there’s more important than the aesthetic or the beautiful outcome of our wedding and it is the idea of union on where I already found someone whom I can be with for the rest of my life. I believe, above all things, this is what really matters.

The Behind the scenes…

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The powerful team behind our wedding

This piece is written so we can inspire partners who wish to tie the knot, partners who view marrying in the church as a daunting process. Yes, it is but a little courage can help to combat it. Back in the time when my wife and I were on the planning stage, all we have is doubt if we can make it or should I say if we can afford it. However, with the positivity and ingenuity that we have we were able to hurdle the barriers.

I have mentioned on my past blog that our wedding would be practical and solemn. Thankfully, we had attained this plan and we did save a lot. Having a very tight budget, we were challenged on how to still make it beautiful and memorable. Good thing we opened ourselves to some peculiar and offbeat concepts and also embraced the idea of getting really involved in the preparation. Our wedding is an experiment and it was purely amateur. But it doesn’t look like one. Thanks to the many people who collaborated with us, those folks who really has genuine hearts and creative souls.

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The team behind our wedding

Well, it is high time for us to say thank you to many people for making our special event really unforgettable. First off, we are so grateful for our parents, godparents and relatives who made everything easy, for the task and the hassle of self-catering, for the logistics and even moral support.

We also want to say utmost thanks to those who offered their talents as a gift. To the wedding host who is my high school best buddy, to the wedding singer with an angelic voice who happens to be my first cousin, to the Pattisier work-friend who baked our wedding cake, to the quintessential shutterbug who captured the perfect moments on her lens, to the team who managed the event coordination in the church up to the reception. In the event specialist who is my partner at work and to the OTD event coordinators who busied themselves attending even to the minutest details so we can have a smooth sailing program and last but not the least, to the chef manager who administered the kitchen, the one that made the food as sumptuous as first-rate menu in high end restaurants. She happens to be our Ninang and that we’re very lucky and honored.

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The team behind our wedding

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Thanks also to venue set-up specialist (Fernando and Mary Ann Catering services) and their crew for the amazing outdoor set up and for their kindness and understanding during the planning stage. Also to the venue itself, the Esquivel Garden and Resort for not being so strict as they let us do whatever we wish with regard to our event plan. Thanks for the reasonable price and also for the generosity. We also don’t want to forget the kind words of the bridal car owner amid some glitches he had observed, his voluntary assistance and the cheap price of his vehicle. Ooops, I forgot! Thank you, too, Angel of Excess salon for the hair and make up of my wife.

Hell yeah! We really had a blast last 12-12-15. Yes, there were some glitches however, they were obscure that only the two of us and other coordinators took heed. And we won’t be telling you, it’s our secret. Hehehe.

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Missing the Rustic life…

Stuck in traffic in the chaotic streets of Manila, I began to utter words of disgust as to what was taking me like eternity into a supposedly short visit to a friend who decided to stay and find a living in the metropolis. Wondering, I opened the bus curtain and gazed outside. Well, the same helter- skelter set up which is common in most of the cities in the Philippines have then resurfaced. I should not be surprised though, after all, this is Manila and what other things can I expect if not about its proverbial road congestion?

I reclined myself and eased away my sight from the busy people cramming the sidewalk, the beggars on every corner, the vendors whose stalls were partly lodged on the road, the rickety jeepneys and buses racing side by side and the maddening sight of garbage piled anywhere. For a while I grappled at this pathetic sight but later surrendered and sighed. Sometimes, moment like this makes me think about the goodness of having to spend the early episodes of my life in the province.

Typical Promdi kids sporting an innocent and carefree spirit.

Typical Promdi kids sporting an innocent and carefree spirit.

Talking about the province, I have had the chance to experience the life which is very much different from the urban subsistence. The restfulness is what makes the difference more elaborate between the two settings, on where, it is more relaxed in the province than in the city. The disarrayed system is one of the many bad effects of industrialization in the city, the very cause on why there is heavy traffic on the road, and on why the chaotic environment is underway. The situation makes me think about those people who permanently dwell in places like Manila, those who don’t have the luxury to afford living in posh subdivisions, those people like my friend whom I’m going to visit who can only afford living in shanties and those fellows who don’t have provinces to go home to. They need to, in whichever way possible, bear the haphazardly kind of environment day in, day out.

Well, I am not saying that living in cities in the Philippines has no beauty at all. In fact many people are still attracted to its allure, leaving their piece of wealth in the province and taking guts just to taste the urban life. I, too, was one of them. I have thought that greener pastures are in the city, much greener than the fields I have been seeing ever since (or so I thought). I have tasted everything the city could offer then—the glamorous night life, the classy corporate jobs, the excitement and wonders brought by malls and other convenient centers, the fancy diners, the technology and innovations that make life a bit easier, and most of all the promise of progress which, in the most practical sense, attracted the rural folks to embrace the city life.

However, in times like when I glance at the bus window and all I could see is the city’s messy atmosphere, I feel like withdrawing or trading all the advantages it can offer to the simple charm brought about by living a rustic life. For about seventeen years, I have had the luxury to enjoy what the province can offer. Having spent my childhood in one of the beautiful towns of Catanduanes, a place we call Panganiban that, in one way or the other, resembles into a small paradise made me feel fortunate. I say fortunate because I don’t need to grapple with the chaotic scenarios like the traffic and other undesirable things we see in the metropolis.

Back in my small town (Panganiban), I was blessed that our humble home is nestled in front of a vast rice field and in close proximity to a long stretch of creek, wherein I can enjoy the pastoral view. In the morning I would see farmers busy doing business in the fields. There are those who collect snails, plow using carabao, plant rice and if it’s harvesting season, there are those farmers who pile hay and children who play kites. And often I would see those small wooden boats sailing in the creek back and forth. I would also see fishermen, crabbers, and even children who play mud at the creek. These are the recurring scenes on my mind, scenes that depict the rural life, which perhaps became the reason on why I was always yearning for a laid-back life in the province.

“A woman carrying a shrimp push net (Agahid).”
Creeks ( Suba) provide the people of Panganiban a source of food and income. Aside from delectable crabs, shrimps also thrive on it. Shrimps like crabs give the town people the means to satisfy their daily needs. If there’s no food at the table, one can just grab his/her shrimp push net and just descend on the waters.

Crabbers are group of folks that comprise the labor force in Panganiban. Panganiban being blessed with abounding sea creatures—crabs, paved a way to creating a decent livelihood for its people. These folks endure the hardships of being exposed to the heat of the sun for a whole day throwing and hoisting the traditional ring-shaped crab nets with the hope of catching more crabs to take home for their family.

Crabbers are group of folks that comprise the labor force in Panganiban. Panganiban being blessed with abounding sea creatures—crabs, paved a way to creating a decent livelihood for its people. These folks endure the hardships of being exposed to the heat of the sun for a whole day throwing and hoisting the traditional ring-shaped crab nets with the hope of catching more crabs to take home for their family.

The traffic, the pathetic sight of those illegal settlers, the beggars, the pile of garbage and the crimes are just few of the reasons on why I always wanted to go home. Go home to a place where I can enjoy walking on the road. Go home to a place where I can go fishing on the creek. Go home to a place that is orderly, quiet and relaxing.

Back to the place where I was at the moment, I opened all over again the bus curtain and gazed outside. As expected, the traffic has barely moved an inch. Again, I lounged at my seat and sighed.